Winter Session Class Schedule

Stay tuned, as classes are created they will be listed here.
Click a course for additional information. Please note that students are only permitted to register for one course during winter session.
AFA 201: The African Experience
ANT 375: Selected Topics in Cultural Anthropology - Ethnographic Film
APP 200: Introduction to Appalachia
BIO 101: Essentials of Biology
BIO 310: Biology of Aging
CIS 300: Management Information Systems
CON 421: Construction Contracts
CRJ 204: Foundations of Corrections
CRJ 423: Special Topics - The Industrial Prison Complex
EDL 900: Field Experiences
ENG 102: Research, Rhetoric, and Writing
FIN 300: Business Finance I
FSE 221: Fire Protection Systems
FSE 445: Advanced Structural Fire Protection
GEO 210: Introduction to Physical Geography
GEO 210: Introduction to Physical Geography
GLY 108: Plate Tectonics - The Active Earth
HEA 285: Health Across the Lifespan
HEA 310: Introduction to Global Health
HIS 300B: Topics in European History - Dress, Politics, and Identity in Renaissance Italy
HSA 412S: Professional Practice Experience II
MAT 095 C: Introductory Algebra C
MUH 171: Music Appreciation
OSH 366: Hazard Identification and Control
OSH 489: Topical Seminar - Introduction to School Safety
OTS 831: Practice Seminar II
PHE 180: Lifetime Wellness
PHE 212: Care and Prevention of Athletic and Exercise Injuries
PHE 327: Sport in American Society
PHI 110: Beginning Philosophy
PLS 103: Police, Order Maintenance and Crime
PLS 410: The Police and Community
POL 220: Introduction to International Relations
POL 250: Introduction to Political Philosophy
PSY 200: Introduction to Psychology
PSY 311: Physiological Psychology
PSY 333: Comparative Psychology
PUB 400: Studies in Public Relations
QMB 200: Business Statistics I
REC 290: Adventure Programming
REC 590: Special Topics - Wildlife Tourism & Research (Undergraduate)
REC 790: Special Topics - Wildlife Tourism & Research (Graduate)
REL 301W: World Religions
SOC 131: Introductory Sociology
SOC 232: Social Statistics
SWK 344: Stress Management & Self-Care
SWK 440: Addictions
SWK 455: Social Justice Through Media & Film

AFA 201: The African Experience
CRN: 70003
Fulfils GE Elements 3b and 6 requirements. In this course, we will ask:
 
  • How did African societies and cultures thrive during the precolonial period?
  • What empires, states and civilizations existed before Africans encountered Europe?
  • Why did European colonial powers colonize Africa in the 19th and 20th centuries?
  • What social, political, and economic transformation accompanied colonial rule in Africa?
  • What factors facilitated the process of decolonization of African in the post-war years?
  • How has post-colonial African countries transformed their societies since their independence from colonial rule?  
  • What are the problems, progress and promise of Africa today? 
This course is 100% on-line. We will examine the questions above through the course texts, videos, class notes, and discussion boards.  AFA 201 Introduces students to the historical, socio-economic, cultural, and political experiences of African peoples in Africa and Diaspora. It fulfills a core requirement for African/African-American Studies. GE Elements 3b and 6. For more information about the course, including the syllabus, contact Dr. Ogechi Anyanwu at ogechi.anyanwu@eku.edu
Course Details:
3 Credit Hours
Syllabus
Instructor(s):
Ogechi Anyanwu

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ANT 375: Selected Topics in Cultural Anthropology - Ethnographic Film
CRN: 70010
From Nanook of the North (1922, Robert J. Flaherty) and Trance and Dance in Bali (1930s, Margaret Mead and Gregory Bateson), to contemporary films such as Poto Mitan (2009, Renee Bergen), anthropologists have used film as a method of data collection as well as a mechanism for communicating the diverse stories of humanity.  This winter intercession course explores anthropology through film, including footage of 1) the popular media’s use of anthropology in reporting contemporary headlines, 2) films by and for anthropologists, and 3) anthropological concepts translated via popular films (think 2001: A Space Odyssey, Rabbit-Proof Fence, Promised Land, and more!).    
 
This visual anthropology course complements existing upper-division courses in cultural anthropology (Medical Anthropology, Kinship and Marriage, Applied Anthropology, Anthropology of Religion) while challenging the contemporary boundaries drawn within the discipline.  Topics to explore include: language, psychology and culture, patterns of production, distribution and consumption, marriage and family, social organization and kinship, political organization, magic and religion, gender and sexuality, and culture change.
 
Coursework will include written analyses of films, quizzes, and discussion board participation.   
 
The coursework will be completed via the Internet in the BlackBoard platform.
Course Details:
3 Credit Hours
Syllabus
Instructor(s):
Jennifer Wies

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APP 200: Introduction to Appalachia
CRN: 70011
An introduction to the interdisciplinary study of the Appalachian region. Special emphasis on the region's place in a national and global context, and on internal and external definitions of the region.
Course Details:
3 Credit Hours
Syllabus (Coming Soon)
Instructor(s):
Catherine Herdman

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BIO 101: Essentials of Biology
CRN: 70038
Are you looking to complete one of your Natural Science General Education requirements this winter term?  Are you interested in learning about current topics in biology like cancer, antibiotic resistance, and global warming in an interactive and engaging setting?  Essentials of Biology (BIO 101) is the course for you! You will be guided through a diverse range of modern topics in biology using videos, online interactive learning modules, discussions, and in home laboratory experiments.  These experiments are a great way to get your whole family involved in learning biology with you.  You will also likely find yourself sharing hot topics in biology at your holiday parties.
Course Details:
3 Credit Hours
Syllabus
Instructor(s):
Rebekah Waikel

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BIO 310: Biology of Aging
CRN: 70040
BIO 310, Biology of Aging is a three hour course designed for the non-biology major interested in the facts and principles of biology related to aging of the human body. This course will provide the foundation necessary for the development of wellness-centered lifestyle choices. The course includes individualized wellness assessments for each student and the development of a comprehensive plan for the maintenance of such a lifestyle.
 
Traditionally, most non-biology majors lack the depth of biological information to be able to grasp the workings of the various organ systems involved; thus, enough biology will be presented for students to understand the normal functions and aging for each of the body’s organ systems. Against this backdrop an understanding of abnormal aging caused by the misuse, abuse, or disuse of the body will be constructed. In addition, students will become aware of various behavioral changes that will increase their chances of healthy aging, i.e., wellness.
 
While much data has been collected through case histories of institutionalized patients, we now recognize many elderly people live out their lives free of the most debilitating effects of aging on the body. Information from cross-sectional and longitudinal studies will be included in the course.
Course Details:
3 Credit Hours
Syllabus
Instructor(s):
Barbara Davis

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CIS 300: Management Information Systems
CRN: 70032
Prerequisites: ACC 201, 202, CIS 212 or INF 104 and ECO 230 with a grade "C" or better in each course; junior standing (a minimum of 60 hours) with an overall minimum of 2.0 GPA. Role of information systems in supporting managers, decision making and organizational goals; planning and managing e-business systems; global competition; social and ethical issues.
Course Details:
3 Credit Hours
Syllabus
Instructor(s):
Chang-Yang Lin

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CRJ 204: Foundations of Corrections
CRN: 70005
An overview of the evolution, structure, and functioning of corrections in the United States. Examines correctional processes, populations, and issues.
Course Details:
3 Credit Hours
Syllabus
Instructor(s):
Kevin Minor

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CRJ 423: Special Topics - The Industrial Prison Complex
CRN: 70026
Over 1.5 million individuals are in our U.S. prison systems, most are nonviolent offenders. This course will explore incarceration in terms of the industrial prison complex—Ideology, Class, and Criminal Justice. This course will specifically examine the “The Rich get Richer and the Poor get Prison,” “The New Jim Crow,” and "The Perpetual Prisoner Machine—How America Profits from Crime." 
 
  • This course is available to non-majors students and would count toward an elective.
  • Criminal Justice and Police studies major can take CRJ 423 Special Topics (elective) for up to 9 hours of credit as long as each course is a different topic and a College Exception form is completed and submitted.
If you like any additional information or have any registration error messages please let me know Stephen.kappeler@eku.edu
Course Details:
3 Credit Hours
Syllabus
Instructor(s):
Stephen Kappeler

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EDL 900: Field Experiences
CRN: 70020
For five years, I lived in Laie, Hawaii and taught at Brigham Young University’s Hawaii Campus.  Now I teach at EKU and I travel to the North Shore of Hawaii every January to hang out at the local schools, eat from food trucks, hike, watch the surf, and camp on the beach.
 
During the winter term you have the opportunity to join me in Hawaii and get credit for an online course, EDL 900, which includes a week of field experiences in Hawaii. Online, during the first part of the course, we will read and discuss educational issues pertaining to teaching in a cultural competent way.
 
The last week of the Winter Semester we will spend on the North Shore of Oahu at the Malekahana Beach Park.  Be prepared to campout in surfing huts on the beach. The park provides one of the pristine beaches for surfing. You will get your own small hut, with solar showers, solar lights, bunk beds, an ocean view, and composting toilets for $30 a night.  It is only for the most adventurous.  Your family is welcome; the huts will sleep four people. Expect to see 30 foot waves and to interact with families from Tonga, Samoa, Fiji, Singapore, and Japan.  We will have the opportunity of a lifetime to compare our educational experiences to theirs.
 
You will be required to purchase your own airline ticket to Honolulu Hawaii, to pay $30 a night for accommodations, to share the cost of a rental van, and to purchase your own food.  I expect the total cost per person will be around $1500 plus tuition. Plan to arrive around sunset on the 9th of December and leave on the night of the15th of December.
 
It will be in the 80’s during the day and in the 60’s at night with an ocean breeze and a chance of light showers daily. I always bring a bathing suit and a towel. Plan on getting in the ocean. Also, plan on doing some short hikes on the beach. Shoes are optional, even in the elementary schools but the local high school, Kahuku High, requires slippers.  Everyone dresses very casually; even the governor wears an Aloha shirt and shorts.
Course Details:
3 Credit Hours
Syllabus
Instructor(s):
Bill Phillips

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ENG 102: Research, Rhetoric, and Writing
CRN: 70001
A writing course refining components of ENG 101 studying information sources and research methods; accessing, critically reading, evaluating, integrating, and documenting primary and secondary sources; utilizing information technology for inquiry, analysis, and argumentation. General Education Element 1B.
Course Details:
3 Credit Hours
Syllabus
Instructor(s):
Barbara Szubinska

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GEO 210: Introduction to Physical Geography
CRN: 70012
Study of natural processes operating at the earth’s surface with special emphasis on weather and climate and landforms as explanations for how and why physical and human phenomena vary from place to place.
Course Details:
3 Credit Hours
Syllabus
Instructor(s):
Don Yow

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GEO 210: Introduction to Physical Geography
CRN: 70013
Study of natural processes operating at the earth’s surface with special emphasis on weather and climate and landforms as explanations for how and why physical and human phenomena vary from place to place.
Course Details:
3 Credit Hours
Syllabus
Instructor(s):
Glenn Campbell

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GLY 108: Plate Tectonics - The Active Earth
CRN: 70033
Investigation of the Earth as it exists and functions today, the materials that compose the Earth, the processes that act upon and within the Earth, and the interrelationship of both materials and processes with human activity.
Course Details:
3 Credit Hours
Syllabus (Coming Soon)
Instructor(s):
Ann Harris

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HEA 285: Health Across the Lifespan
CRN: 70006
Consideration of the various conditions and factors affecting individual and community health; special emphasis is on responsible decision-making, formulating philosophies, attitudes, and a behavioral understanding necessary to establish health living practices. Fulfills University Wellness requirement.
Course Details:
3 Credit Hours
Syllabus
Instructor(s):
Laurie Larkin

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HEA 310: Introduction to Global Health
CRN: 70007
Consideration of the various conditions and factors affecting individual and community health; special emphasis is on responsible decision-making, formulating philosophies, attitudes, and a behavioral understanding necessary to establish health living practices. Fulfills University Wellness requirement.
Course Details:
3 Credit Hours
Syllabus (Coming Soon)
Instructor(s):
Julie Lasslo

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HIS 300B: Topics in European History - Dress, Politics, and Identity in Renaissance Italy
CRN: 70015
This class will study and analyze the way in which cloth, clothes, and dress accessories were used by the people of Renaissance Italy, with special focus on the city-state of Florence, to construct their identity at the communal, familiar, and individual level. During this time period, most of Italy, and especially Florence, was undergoing a number of economic, political, and social changes, and clothing was used to illustrate those changes or used as an attempt to arrest change and maintain the status quo.  Deciding what to wear was very often a public act and considered important enough by the Florentine government (as it was across Western Europe) to pass specific laws (called sumptuary laws) to regulate what people wore.  Laws were passed so that clothing could bolster the city’s economy, maintain socially acceptable gender norms, glorify the city, express family honor, bolster a particular government, as well as a way identify marginal social groups such as prostitutes and Jews.  This class will identify the main articles of dress for both sexes and contextualize the use of clothes within the social, economic, and political mileu of Renaissance Italy generally, and Florence specifically, (roughly circa 1300-1650).
Course Details:
3 Credit Hour
Syllabus
Instructor(s):
Catherine Stearn

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MAT 095 C: Introductory Algebra C
CRN: 70002
Work online over winter break to complete the last module of MAT 095 so that you can begin spring semester in your next math class!
Course Details:
1 Credit Hour
Syllabus
Instructor(s):
Katherine Fair

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MUH 171: Music Appreciation
CRN: 70036
May not count toward a music major or minor. Provides the general college student with a cultural background in music. Masterpieces of music, composers, and techniques presented through listening materials and concert attendance.
Course Details:
3 Credit Hours
Syllabus (Coming Soon)
Instructor(s):
Candace James

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OSH 366: Hazard Identification and Control
CRN: 70035
Prerequisite: OSH 361 or departmental approval. A virtual and hands-on practical approach toward hazard identification and control. Areas of study include noise levels, chemical and electrical hazards, air contaminants, and heat/cold stress. Control measures include administrative, engineering, and safeguarding methods.
Course Details:
3 Credit Hours
Syllabus
Instructor(s):
Troy Rawlins

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OSH 489: Topical Seminar - Introduction to School Safety
CRN: 70034
This course is designed as an introductory course covering school safety for educators of all levels, education administrators, and risk managers. The course will approach safety from the aspect of managing loss potentials for educational service employees, students, and school visitors. The course progresses from defining school safety and exploring the concept of safety as a leadership principle to a descriptive project of school safety by occupational classifications and culminating by exploring foundational management techniques for school safety and their application in some common safety issues.
Course Details:
3 Credit Hours
Syllabus
Instructor(s):
Ronald Dotson

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OTS 831: Practice Seminar II
CRN: 70044
Prerequisites OTS 821 or Corequisites: OTS 824 and OTS 832. Integration of occupation-based practice through reflection on curriculum themes, participation in community-based settings, preparation for Level II Fieldwork and ongoing development of a professional portfolio.
Course Details:
2 Credit Hours
Syllabus (Coming Soon)
Instructor(s):
Elaine Fehringer

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PHI 110: Beginning Philosophy
CRN: 70016
What's the meaning of life? What's ultimately real? What happens when we die? Is there a soul? a God? Is there an objectively right way to live one's life?  Explore these questions and more (and get 3B Humanities Gen Ed credit to boot) in PHILOSOPHY 110!
Course Details:
3 Credit Hours
Syllabus
Instructor(s):
Steve Parchment

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PLS 103: Police, Order Maintenance and Crime
CRN: 70037
Overview of the role of police. The historical development of policing, police functions and bureaucratic organization are examined. Police misconduct, discretion and effectiveness receive special attention.
Course Details:
3 Credit Hours
Syllabus
Instructor(s):
Michael Land

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PSY 200: Introduction to Psychology
CRN: 70017
Learn about the diversity and relevance of Psychology.  The knowledge gained will change your life and your understanding of people around you.
Course Details:
3 Credit Hours
Syllabus (Coming Soon)
Instructor(s):
Adam Lawson

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PSY 311: Physiological Psychology
CRN: 70018
How does the brain work? Why are some people obese? And what makes sex so good? Take this class to find the answers to these questions! We will be talking about the biological mechanisms behind human behaviors and some of the primal instincts that drive us. Please watch this short video if you want to learn more about this course. Prerequisites include: PSY 250 and ENG 102 or ENG 105(B) or HON 102. Special permission to sign up may be granted by the instructor. 
Course Details:
3 Credit Hours
Syllabus
Instructor(s):
Michael Chen

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PSY 333: Comparative Psychology
CRN: 70019
This class explores animal minds and animal behavior, introducing students to animal intelligence, memory, communication, language, emotion, and even more!  Topics include history of scientific studies, learning, memory, representation, intelligence, knowledge, innovation, culture, communication, development, emotion, social skill, consciousness, and theory of mind.
Course Details:
3 Credit Hours
Syllabus (Coming Soon)
Instructor(s):
Radhika Makecha

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QMB 200: Business Statistical I
CRN: 70004
Business applications of probability, measures of central tendency, dispersion, sampling, correlation and hypothesis testing.
Course Details:
3 Credit Hours
Syllabus
Instructor(s):
Benjamin Woodruff

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REC 290: Adventure Programming
CRN: 70021
This course includes the essential elements and techniques used in Adventure Programming and outdoor recreation including program design and technical skill development, facilitation, risk management, safety procedures, and equipment management.
 
Topics investigated in this course will include:
  • Developing a background knowledge of the history of Adventure Programming
  • Experiential education opportunities through technical skill development
  • Learning and exploring various techniques related to group travel and outdoor leadership
  • Ethics related to Leave No Trace and minimizing environmental impact
  • Current issues in Adventure Tourism and Outdoor Recreation
  • Group development and dynamics
  • Basic facilitation techniques
Course highlights include:
  • Lodging and classroom accommodations at Maywood’s Environmental & Educational Laboratory
  • One overnight backpacking trip
  • Outdoor recreation related service learning project
  • Opportunity to earn a Leave No Trace Trainer Certification
While this course is designed for recreation, park, tourism, wildlife, and related majors, all students are encouraged to inquire if interested. Please contact Professor Brian Clark at brian.clark@eku.edu
Course Details:
3 Credit Hours
Syllabus (Coming Soon)
Instructor(s):
Brian Clark

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REC 590: Special Topics - Wildlife Tourism & Research (Undergraduate)
CRN: 70022
This course includes the essential elements and techniques used in social science research, especially relating to human dimensions of natural resource and wildlife-based recreation and tourism. 
 
Topics investigated in this course will include:
  • Developing research questions and total research design
  • Methodology and data collection
  • Sampling techniques
  • Ethics related to research and the environment
  • Analysis and dissemination
  • Current issues in wildlife-based tourism
  • Education and interpretive techniques
Course highlights include:
  • Travel to Coastal Georgia for 8 days
  • Natural, cultural, & historical experiences
  • Visit Georgia Sea Turtle Center (Sea Turtle Rehabilitation Site)
  • Visit many other outdoor/wildlife recreation sites
  • Wildlife-related service learning project
Course fee required ($450). While this course is designed for recreation, park, tourism, wildlife, and related majors, all students are encouraged to inquire if interested. Please contact Professor Michael Bradley at michael.bradley@eku.edu
Course Details:
3 Credit Hours
Syllabus
Instructor(s):
Michael Bradley

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REC 790: Special Topics - Wildlife Tourism & Research (Graduate)
CRN: 70023
This course includes the essential elements and techniques used in social science research, especially relating to human dimensions of natural resource and wildlife-based recreation and tourism. 
 
Topics investigated in this course will include:
  • Developing research questions and total research design
  • Methodology and data collection
  • Sampling techniques
  • Ethics related to research and the environment
  • Analysis and dissemination
  • Current issues in wildlife-based tourism
  • Education and interpretive techniques
Course highlights include:
  • Travel to Coastal Georgia for 8 days
  • Natural, cultural, & historical experiences
  • Visit Georgia Sea Turtle Center (Sea Turtle Rehabilitation Site)
  • Visit many other outdoor/wildlife recreation sites
  • Wildlife-related service learning project
Course fee required ($450). While this course is designed for recreation, park, tourism, wildlife, and related majors, all students are encouraged to inquire if interested. Please contact Professor Michael Bradley at michael.bradley@eku.edu
Course Details:
3 Credit Hours
Syllabus
Instructor(s):
Michael Bradley

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SOC 131: Introductory Sociology
CRN: 70030
Sociology focuses on understanding and questioning the societies and the world in which we live. To do this, we need to change the ways in which we typically think about society and social behavior. This requires what C. Wright Mills referred to as the “sociological imagination.” The “sociological imagination” is a way of thinking or perspective which requires that we test our preconceived notions about human social behavior and how society works overall.  It requires that we understand how the organization of a society influences both individual and group behavior.
 
In this course you will be introduced to the sociological perspective and how this way of thinking gives us the tools necessary for understanding, evaluating, and interpreting human social behavior.
Course Details:
3 Credit Hours
Syllabus
Instructor(s):
Dionne Smith

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