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Winter Session Class Schedule

Stay tuned, as classes are created they will be listed here.
Click a course for additional information. Please note that students are only permitted to register for one course during winter session.
ANT 365: Primatology Field School
APP 200: Introduction to Appalachia
ART 200: Art Appreciation
BIO 101: Essentials of Biology
BIO 301: Human Physiology
BIO 529: Microbiology in Everyday Life (Undergraduate)
BIO 729: Microbiology in Everyday Life (Graduate)
CRJ 423: The Industrial Prison Complex
ENG 102: Research, Writing, & Rhetoric
GEO 210: Introduction to Physical Geography
GEO 210: Introduction to Physical Geography
HEA 285: Health Across the Lifespan
HEA 310: Introduction to Global Health
HEA 463: Internship in Health Promotion & Administration
HIS 300B: Food, Society, & Identity in Early Modern England
HSA 412S: Professional Practice Experience II
MAT 095C: Introductory Algebra C
OSH 366: Hazard Identification & Control
OSH 489: Introduction to School Safety
PHE 201: Foundations of Sport Science
PHE 212: Care & Prevention of Athletic & Exercise Injuries
PHE 327: Sport in American Society
PHI 110: Beginning Philosophy
PLS 410: The Police and Community
POL 101: Introduction to American Government
PSY 200: Introduction to Psychology
PSY 311: Physiological Psychology
REC 290: Adventure Programming
REC 590: Wildlife Tourism & Research (Undergraduate)
REC 790: Wildlife Tourism & Research (Graduate)
REL 301W: World Religions - Writing Intensive
SWK 440: Addictions

ANT 365: Primatology Field School
CRN: 70016
The aim of this course is to show how physical anthropologists design and conduct a research project, collect data on foraging and social behavior in free-ranging primates,    evaluate their data, and compare their results with those of other researchers.
 
In Winter Term 2017 students in ANT 365 will observe primates at the Lemur Conservation Foundation (LCF), Myakka City, FL.  Lemurs live in a naturalistic habitat where they travel, forage, and interact socially, much as they would in their native habitat. Students will become part of the team who study this population, in an on-going multidisciplinary research project.
Course Details:
3 Credit Hours
Syllabus
Instructor(s):
Benjamin Freed

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APP 200: Introduction to Appalachia
CRN: 70004
An introduction to the interdisciplinary study of the Appalachian region.  Special emphasis on the region's place in a national and global context, and on internal and external definitions of the region.
Course Details:
3 Credit Hours
Syllabus (Coming Soon)
Instructor(s):
Catherine Herdman

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ART 200: Art Appreciation
CRN: 70011
An Introduction to the visual arts and their purposes, emphasis on ways and means available to the artist. Student has opportunity for individual expression through a visual arts medium. Gen. Ed. E-3A [AH].
 
The purpose of this course is to give the student a general overview of the social and cultural significance of art and the aesthetic modes of other societies. Students will be guided in understanding the cultural matrixes of various styles, forms of art, and techniques relative to contemporary society in order to make aesthetic judgments in daily life. In addition, students will be assisted in gaining an understanding of the formal and verbal language of art. Lastly, each student will be guided in improving his or her written, oral, and cognitive skills in developing an appreciation for art.
Course Details:
3 Credit Hours
Syllabus
Instructor(s):
Ida Kumoji-Ankrah

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BIO 101: Essentials of Biology
CRN: 70027
Are you looking to complete one of your Natural Science General Education requirements this winter term?  Are you interested in learning about current topics in biology like cancer, antibiotic resistance, and global warming in an interactive and engaging setting?  Essentials of Biology (BIO 101) is the course for you! You will be guided through a diverse range of modern topics in biology using videos, online interactive learning modules, discussions, and in home laboratory experiments.  These experiments are a great way to get your whole family involved in learning biology with you.  You will also likely find yourself sharing hot topics in biology at your holiday parties.
Course Details:
3 Credit Hours
Syllabus
Instructor(s):
Rebekah Waikel

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BIO 301: Human Physiology
CRN: 70033
Human Physiology explores how the human body functions under normal conditions. The core theme of homeostasis is emphasized in this course specifically designed for allied health personnel entering a health career profession. This course is also appropriate for physical education and law enforcement personnel who desire a general knowledge of the human body. Credit for this course does not apply toward a major or minor in biology, but the course may be taken by biology majors as a free elective.
Course Details:
3 Credit Hours
Syllabus
Instructor(s):
Barbara Davis

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BIO 529: Microbiology in Everyday Life (Undergraduate)
CRN: 70025
Microbiology in Everyday Life addresses the natural world of microbiology and how it relates to any person and their health, their family’s health, and their environment.  The course is particularly applicable to biology teachers who want to know more about microorganisms and the natural world.  Science is discovering more and more about how the microbiome, the microbes that live in and on our bodies, play a role in our health and behavior.  This course will discuss many aspects of microbiology, particularly as it applies to your own health, and how the subject can be made interesting and relevant to students at all grade levels.
Course Details:
3 Credit Hours
Syllabus (Coming Soon)
Instructor(s):
Marcia Pierce

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BIO 729: Microbiology in Everyday Life (Graduate)
CRN: 70026
Microbiology in Everyday Life addresses the natural world of microbiology and how it relates to any person and their health, their family’s health, and their environment.  The course is particularly applicable to biology teachers who want to know more about microorganisms and the natural world.  Science is discovering more and more about how the microbiome, the microbes that live in and on our bodies, play a role in our health and behavior.  This course will discuss many aspects of microbiology, particularly as it applies to your own health, and how the subject can be made interesting and relevant to students at all grade levels.
Course Details:
3 Credit Hours
Syllabus (Coming Soon)
Instructor(s):
Marcia Pierce

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CRJ 423: Special Topics - The Industrial Prison Complex
CRN: 70003
Over 1.5 million individuals are in our U.S. prison systems, most are nonviolent offenders. This course will explore incarceration in terms of the industrial prison complex—Ideology, Class, and Criminal Justice.
 
This course will specifically examine the “The Rich get Richer and the Poor get Prison,” “The New Jim Crow,” and "The Perpetual Prisoner Machine—How America Profits from Crime."  This course will be delivered as a hybrid course online (first part of the course) and live at the regional campuses (Last part of the course /after the New Year). I will travel to each of the regional campuses for the live sections (TBA). In addition we will be visiting a local jail, a state prison, and a federal prison (TBA).
  • This course is available to non-majors students and would count toward an elective.
  • Criminal Justice and Police studies major can take CRJ 423 Special Topics (elective) for up to 9 hours of credit as long as each course is a different topic and a College Exception form is completed and submitted.
If you like any additional information or have any registration error messages please let me know Stephen.kappeler@eku.edu
Course Details:
3 Credit Hours
Syllabus
Instructor(s):
Stephen Kappeler

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ENG 102: Research, Rhetoric, and Writing
CRN: 70001
A writing course refining components of ENG 101 studying information sources and research methods; accessing, critically reading, evaluating, integrating, and documenting primary and secondary sources; utilizing information technology for inquiry, analysis, and argumentation. General Education Element 1B.
Course Details:
3 Credit Hours
Syllabus
Instructor(s):
Barbara Szubinska

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GEO 210: Introduction to Physical Geography
CRN: 70019
Learn about the world around you and how it works.  From hurricanes to volcanoes, explore the processes that affect the air, land, and water on which humans rely for life.  This knowledge will help you make well-informed decisions as a private citizen and as a global citizen.
Course Details:
3 Credit Hours
Syllabus
Instructor(s):
Don Yow

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GEO 210: Introduction to Physical Geography
CRN: 70020
Learn about the world around you and how it works.  From hurricanes to volcanoes, explore the processes that affect the air, land, and water on which humans rely for life.  This knowledge will help you make well-informed decisions as a private citizen and as a global citizen.
Course Details:
3 Credit Hours
Syllabus (Coming Soon)
Instructor(s):
Glenn Campbell

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HEA 285: Health Across the Lifespan
CRN: 70022
Consideration of the various conditions and factors affecting individual and community health; special emphasis is on responsible decision-making, formulating philosophies, attitudes, and a behavioral understanding necessary to establish health living practices.
Course Details:
3 Credit Hours
Syllabus (Coming Soon)
Instructor(s):
Laurel Schwartz

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HEA 310: Introduction to Global Health
CRN: 70023
Exploration of epidemiological, economic, political, sociological and cultural factors that impact global health with special emphasis on applying public health prinicples in developing as well as developed countires.
Course Details:
3 Credit Hours
Syllabus (Coming Soon)
Instructor(s):
Julie Lasslo

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HEA 463: Internship in Health Promotion & Administration
CRN: 70024
Supervised experiences for seniors in the directing of Health Promotion and Administration activities in various settings. May be retaken to a maximum of six hours.
Course Details:
3 Credit Hour
Syllabus (Coming Soon)
Instructor(s):
Michelyn Bhandari

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HIS 300B: Food, Society, & Identity in Early Modern England
CRN: 70017
BELIEVE IT OR NOT, FOOD HAS A HISTORY!!! This particular slice of food history will come from Early Modern England between 1540 and1640, when it underwent a number of radical political, social, religious, and economic changes. It was during this period that England broke with the Roman Catholic church and created its own unique form of Protestant Christianity. In this one hundred year period, it also started to reject the idea of monarchy and adopt the idea that political authority rested with the English people. It was also a time of severe economic dislocation as the population grew at an unprecedented rate alongside an alarming rise of inflation. 
 
This course examines the ways food played a major role in creating and defining the increasing separation of social classes, religious groups, and political affiliations that arose amidst these momentous changes in English history. Through the class readings and assignments, students will identify and analyze the role food played in demarcating an individual’s or a particular (social, political or religious) group’s identity. Food was also used as a means of creating relationships both among members of the same group as well as a means to forge bonds across those lines. The course will examine what people of different social, religious and political groups ate as well as what people thought other groups should eat and why.  Indeed the changing ideas about who should eat what both created and reflected the political, religious and social issues that were unfolding in England between 1540 and 1640. Please Note: the workload and pace of this course will be intense as you are expected to do a semester’s worth of work in just 3 weeks!
Course Details:
3 Credit Hours
Syllabus
Instructor(s):
Catherine Stearn

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HSA 412S: Professional Practice Experience II
CRN: 70006
Prerequisite: Department approval. Internship assignment to health care organization for observation and practice of management functions.
Course Details:
3 Credit Hours
Syllabus
Instructor(s):
Dawn Jackson

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MAT 095C: Introductory Algebra C
CRN: 70008
Work online over winter break to complete the last module of MAT 095 C so that you can begin spring semester in your next math class!
Course Details:
1 Credit Hour
Syllabus
Instructor(s):
Katherine Fair

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OSH 366: Hazard Identification and Control
CRN: 70030
Prerequisite: OSH 361 or departmental approval. A virtual and hands-on practical approach toward hazard identification and control. Areas of study include noise levels, chemical and electrical hazards, air contaminants, and heat/cold stress. Control measures include administrative, engineering, and safeguarding methods.
Course Details:
3 Credit Hours
Syllabus
Instructor(s):
Troy Rawlins

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OSH 489: Topical Seminar - Introduction to School Safety
CRN: 70031
This course is designed as an introductory course covering school safety for educators of all levels, education administrators, and risk managers. The course will approach safety from the aspect of managing loss potentials for educational service employees, students, and school visitors. The course progresses from defining school safety and exploring the concept of safety as a leadership principle to a descriptive project of school safety by occupational classifications and culminating by exploring foundational management techniques for school safety and their application in some common safety issues.
Course Details:
3 Credit Hours
Syllabus
Instructor(s):
Ronald Dotson

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PHE 201: Foundations of Sport Science
CRN: 70029
Introduction to the profession, exposure to professional standards in the field, and historical perspective and philosophies in physical education and sports science.
Course Details:
3 Credit Hours
Syllabus
Instructor(s):
Michael Land

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PHE 212: Care & Prevention of Athletic & Exercise Injuries
CRN: 70028
This course is designed to explore different considerations in the management of healthy athletes to prevent injury as well as providing a background understanding of how to manage situations in which injury does occur. Students will get a general understanding of topics like: emergency management preparation, nutrition, strength and conditioning, injury evaluation and recognition, and injury treatment. Throughout the course students will complete learning activities to gain a foundational understanding of concepts and information and then apply that information through a series of direct application based assignments. This course is a require course for the BS in Physical Education Degree at EKU and serves as a prerequisite for EKU’s MS in AT Program.
Course Details:
3 Credit Hours
Syllabus
Instructor(s):
Matthew Sabin

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PHE 327: Sport in American Society
CRN: 70032
This course examines the impact of sport in American society with attention to the relationship of political, economic, ethnic, and institutional forces operating within an on the phenomena we call sport.
Course Details:
3 Credit Hours
Syllabus
Instructor(s):
James Hinerman

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PHI 110: Beginning Philosophy
CRN: 70021
What's the meaning of life? What's ultimately real? What happens when we die? Is there a soul? a God? Is there an objectively right way to live one's life?  Explore these questions and more (and get 3B Humanities Gen Ed credit to boot) in PHILOSOPHY 110!
Course Details:
3 Credit Hours
Syllabus
Instructor(s):
Steve Parchment

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PLS 410: The Police and Community
CRN: 70015
Examines relationships between the police and community that address crime and quality of life problems. Community is examined as a geographical space made of multiple and diverse publics sometimes requiring different strategies and attention. A distinction is drawn between public relations and police community partnerships.
Course Details:
3 Credit Hours
Syllabus
Instructor(s):
Victor Kappeler

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POL 101: Introduction to American Government
CRN: 70007
Principles, functions, and basic political institutions of the American system of government at the national level.
Course Details:
3 Credit Hours
Syllabus (Coming Soon)
Instructor(s):
Joe Gershtenson

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PSY 200: Introduction to Psychology
CRN: 70010
A survey of the major content areas and methods of psychology including history, biological correlates, cognition, language, intelligence, motivation, emotion, development, personality, abnormal, therapy, and social behavior.
Course Details:
3 Credit Hours
Syllabus (Coming Soon)
Instructor(s):
Adam Lawson

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PSY 311: Physiological Psychology
CRN: 70009
How does the brain work? Why are some people obese? And what makes sex so good? Take this class to find the answers to these questions! We will be talking about the biological mechanisms behind human behaviors and some of the primal instincts that drive us. Please watch this short video if you want to learn more about this course. Prerequisites include: PSY 250 and ENG 102 or ENG 105(B) or HON 102. Special permission to sign up may be granted by the instructor. 
Course Details:
3 Credit Hours
Syllabus
Instructor(s):
Michael Chen

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REC 290: Adventure Programming
CRN: 70002
This course includes the essential elements and techniques used in Adventure Programming and outdoor recreation including program design and technical skill development, facilitation, risk management, safety procedures, and equipment management.
 
Topics investigated in this course will include:
  • Developing a background knowledge of the history of Adventure Programming
  • Experiential education opportunities through technical skill development
  • Learning and exploring various techniques related to group travel and outdoor leadership
  • Ethics related to Leave No Trace and minimizing environmental impact
  • Current issues in Adventure Tourism and Outdoor Recreation
  • Group development and dynamics
  • Basic facilitation techniques
Course highlights include:
  • Lodging and classroom accommodations at Maywood’s Environmental & Educational Laboratory
  • One overnight backpacking trip
  • Outdoor recreation related service learning project
  • Opportunity to earn a Leave No Trace Trainer Certification
While this course is designed for recreation, park, tourism, wildlife, and related majors, all students are encouraged to inquire if interested. Please contact Professor Brian Clark at brian.clark@eku.edu
Course Details:
3 Credit Hours
Syllabus (Coming Soon)
Instructor(s):
Brian Clark

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REC 590: Special Topics - Wildlife Tourism & Research (Undergraduate)
CRN: 70013
This course includes the essential elements and techniques used in social science research, especially relating to human dimensions of natural resource and wildlife-based recreation and tourism. 
 
Topics investigated in this course will include:
  • Developing research questions and total research design
  • Methodology and data collection
  • Sampling techniques
  • Ethics related to research and the environment
  • Analysis and dissemination
  • Current issues in wildlife-based tourism
  • Education and interpretive techniques
Course highlights include:
  • Travel to Everglades National Park (Jan 2 - 10)
  • Natural, cultural, & historical experiences
  • Visit many other outdoor/wildlife recreation sites
  • Wildlife-related service learning project
Course fee required ($450). While this course is designed for recreation, park, tourism, wildlife, and related majors, all students are encouraged to inquire if interested. Please contact Professor Michael Bradley at michael.bradley@eku.edu
Course Details:
3 Credit Hours
Syllabus (Coming Soon)
Instructor(s):
Michael Bradley

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REC 790: Special Topics - Wildlife Tourism & Research (Graduate)
CRN: 70014
This course includes the essential elements and techniques used in social science research, especially relating to human dimensions of natural resource and wildlife-based recreation and tourism. 
 
Topics investigated in this course will include:
  • Developing research questions and total research design
  • Methodology and data collection
  • Sampling techniques
  • Ethics related to research and the environment
  • Analysis and dissemination
  • Current issues in wildlife-based tourism
  • Education and interpretive techniques
Course highlights include:
  • Travel to Everglades National Park (Jan 2 - 10)
  • Natural, cultural, & historical experiences
  • Visit many other outdoor/wildlife recreation sites
  • Wildlife-related service learning project
Course fee required ($450). While this course is designed for recreation, park, tourism, wildlife, and related majors, all students are encouraged to inquire if interested. Please contact Professor Michael Bradley at michael.bradley@eku.edu
Course Details:
3 Credit Hours
Syllabus (Coming Soon)
Instructor(s):
Michael Bradley

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REL 301W: World Religions (Writing Intensive)
CRN: 70012
This course introduces students to the beliefs and practices of diverse world’s religions. Special attention will be given to Jewish, Christian, Muslim, Hindu, and Buddhist traditions. We will use documentaries and written materials from several websites to illustrate the complexity and diversity of the aforementioned religious traditions.
 
All religious traditions will be studied with a sympathetic yet critical attitude. By “critical” we do not mean secular or against religions but rather scholarly. Our descriptions will take into account insider’s perspectives and respect as much as possible the self-understanding of religions. However, the course will give priority to scholarly methods and historical-critical perspectives.
Course Details:
3 Credit Hours
Syllabus
Instructor(s):
Abraham Velez

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SWK 440: Addictions
CRN: 70018
This course provides relevant theory and skills needed by social workers to address substance abuse problems that they will encounter with clients in various practice settings. This online course uses discussion, presentations, 'field work', and videos, to facilitate learning. The course will examine current theories pertaining to substance abuse problems, the role of self-help (mutual aid) groups, assessment strategies appropriate to social work settings, motivational enhancement, relapse prevention, family issues, key public policy issues, and the treatment system. The course will also examine the influence of gender, age, race, disability and sexual orientation on addiction and recovery.
 
Please consider taking my Winter 2017 Addictions Course.  The course is 100% online.  Students in the past have really enjoyed this course and gained a lot of valuable information about working with those who suffer from addictions of every kind—from substances, gambling, eating and sexual addictions.  I would enjoy having you in my course for this Winter 2017 session.  For more information please email me: caroline.reid@eku.edu.
Course Details:
3 Credit Hours
Syllabus
Instructor(s):
Caroline Reid

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